1863

Jan 1
Emancipation Proclamation takes effect




Jan 12
Third Session, First Confederate Congress, convenes




Jan 31
Blockade of Charleston, South Carolina disrupted






Mar 23
Congress authorizes Sixth issue of CSA notes



Apr 6
Sixth issue of notes issued






Apr 17
Congress authorizes Fourth Issue of CSA notes



Apr 19
Earliest use of CS10




































Apr 21
Earliest use of CS8 and CS11AD









































Apr 23
Earliest use of CS9




























May 1
Earliest use of CS12AD

Third Session, First Confederate Congress adjourns






May 1-4
Battle of Chancellorsville














May 18
Siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi begins



















June 1
Earliest use of CS13

















July 1-3
Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

July 4
Vicksburg surrenders to the Union












September 19-20
Battle of Chickamauga, Georgia




Novmber 23-25
Battle of Chattanooga, Tennessee




December 7
Fourth Session, First Confederate Congress, convenes



Confederate Stamps -- 1863

Provisionals     1861     1862     1864

Engraved Issues

In 1863, Postmaster General John Reagan was finally able to provide steel-plate printed stamps similar to those used in the United States. John Archer, an engraver and steel-plate printer from New York, arrived in Richmond in the Fall of 1861. He formed a partnership with plasterer Joseph Daly, and secured the contract for printing the five cent stamps from the De la Rue plates. This led to the firm's producing its own steel-engraved stamps (and fractional currency) in 1863. The design of CS9, CS10, CS11, and CS12, is similar to the bust on the 50 cent fractional notes produced by Archer & Daly in 1863 (T63) and by Archer & Halpin in 1864 (T74).

Image of Jefferson Davis, line-engraved on steel by John Archer, transferred to a copper plate, and printed by Archer & Daly. This design is known as the "Frame-Line" because incised lines were ruled on the plate, intended as a guide to making the transfers. Earliest use April 19, 1863.

CS10 Ten cents
Jefferson Davis

(from the Kimbrough collection, by permission)


CS8 Two cents
Andrew Jackson
Image of Andrew Jackson of Tennessee, 7th President of the United States. The design is modified from the vignette of the US 2 cent "Black Jack" stamp of 1861, and is similar to the portrait of Jackson on the Confederate $1000 bill (T1) of 1861. Line-engraved by Frederick Halpin, transfered to a steel plate, and printed by Archer & Daly. Earliest use was April 21, 1863.
CS11 is the "Frame-line" with the frames removed, transferred to steel printing plates, and printed by Archer & Daly. Colors range from milky blue to dark blue, and from light greenish-blue to nearly true green. Earliest use was April 21, 1863.


CS11AD Ten cents
Jefferson Davis


CS9 Ten cents
Jefferson Davis
Line-engraved on steel by John Archer, transferred to a copper plate, and printed by Archer & Daly. Unlike CS10, CS11, and CS12, the denomination is spelled out "Ten". This was engraved shortly after the "Frame-line", but was rejected, partly because the image was said to resemble too closely Abraham Lincoln! But since the stamps had been printed, they were eventually released. Earliest use April 23, 1863.

CS12 is not related to CS10 or 11, but is a completely new line-engraving on steel by Frederick Halpin, transferred to steel printing plates, and printed by Archer & Daly. The Halpin die differs from Archer's in numerous details, most notably the filled-in background at the corners of the scrolls. Earliest use was May 1, 1863.


CS12AD Ten cents
Jefferson Davis
Plate block of 12, with imprint reflecting Joseph Daly's departure from the firm
An unknown number of sheets of both CS11 and CS12 were perforated in gauge 12 1/2. The experiment proved to be impractical, but the perforated stamps were released for use.


CS11AD Ten cents Perforated
Jefferson Davis

There was not really much need for a 20 cent stamp. Because of the lack of specie and coins in the Confederacy, the main function of the 20 cent green was to circulate as fractional small change.


CS13 Twenty cents
George Washington
Image of George Washington of Virginia, first president of the United States. Line-engraved on steel by Frederick Halpin, transferred to steel printing plates, and printed by Archer & Daly. Colors range from deep green to milky-green, bluish-green or yellow-green. Earliest use was June 1, 1863.
Occasionally the 20 cent green was cut in half and used as a 10 cent stamp. Such bisects were legal but are very scarce.


Left diagnonal bisect postmarked Houston, Texas May 8 (presumeably 1864 although 1865 is possible)



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